At Home Business Ideas: Home Assembling Jobs- Is It a Scam?

At Home Business Ideas:

Home Assembling Jobs- Is It a Scam?

Scams trick you into handing over your money by offering you a ‘guaranteed’ way to make fast money or a high-paying job for little effort. This article covers the risks associated with home assembling job and business opportunities. I will cover;

  • How does this scam work?
  • Warning signs
  • Protect yourself
  • Have you been scammed?
  • More information
  • How does It Work

The job on offer may require you to do something simple such as stuffing envelopes or assembling a home product using materials that you have to buy from the ‘employer’.  To accept the job you will be asked to pay for a starter kit or materials relevant to the job or scheme.

If you pay the fee you may not receive anything or what you do receive is not what you expected or were promised. For example, instead of a ‘business plan’, you may be sent instructions for how to get other people to join the same scheme.

On completion of your work, the scammer will refuse to pay you for some or all of your work, using excuses such as the work not being up to the required standard.

Another type of job opportunity scam asks you to use your bank account to receive and pass on payments for a foreign company. The scammers promise you a percentage commission for each payment you pass on. This is likely to be a form of money laundering which is a criminal offense.

If you provide your account details the scammer may use them to steal your money or commit other fraudulent activities.

at home Business Idea

Warning signs

  • You come across an advertisement or receive an email, letter or phone call offering you a guaranteed income or job.
  • The message may claim lots of money can be made with little effort using your personal computer, or guarantee large returns.
  • The message is not addressed to you personally.
  • The message asks you to provide personal details or a fee for more information about the job or start-up materials.
  • The message does not have a street address, only a post office box, or an email address.
  • You are asked to transfer money on behalf of someone else, which may be money laundering.

How to Protect yourself from at home business ideas that are scams

  • Be suspicious of unsolicited ‘at home business ideas and opportunities or job offers, particularly those that offer a ‘guaranteed income’ or require you to pay an upfront fee.
  • If the job involves making or selling a certain type of product or service, find out if there is really a market for it.
  • Ask for references from other people who have done the work or used the product, and make the effort to speak to these people.
  • Do not deal with an employer or company that does not have a street address, they can be difficult to contact or trace later on
  • Avoid any arrangement with a stranger that asks for up-front payment via money order, wire transfer, international funds transfer, pre-loaded card or electronic currency. It is rare to recover money sent this way.
  • Never agree to transfer money for someone else – this is money laundering and it is a criminal offense.

Impossible Expectations

The most common theme in many scams is that you have to meet very unrealistic expectations in service delivery. I have researched incidences and the best way forward is to ask questions and protect yourself;

  • Be suspicious of unsolicited at home business ideas and opportunities or job offers, particularly those that offer a ‘guaranteed income’ or require you to pay an upfront fee.
  • If the job involves making or selling a certain type of product or service, find out if there is really a market for it.
  • Ask for references from other people who have done the work or used the product, and make the effort to speak to these people.
  • Do not deal with an employer or company that does not have a street address, they can be difficult to contact or trace later on
  • Avoid any arrangement with a stranger that asks for up-front payment via money order, wire transfer, international funds transfer, pre-loaded card or electronic currency. It is rare to recover money sent this way.
  • Never agree to transfer money for someone else – this is money laundering and it is a criminal offence.

Ask Yourself These Questions.

  • Is there a legitimate market already set up for this product?
  • Are suppliers contracts in place with distributors?
  • Is there a legitimate address and contact details?
  • Do they provide an email and website contact details with people’s names that you can check on?
  • What is your pay rate?
  • What is the training and who pays for it?

Most handcrafted products that I am labor intensive with little return on investment. In fact, in Tory Johnson’s book, Will Work From Home, she says:

“We’ve tried to find legitimate craft assembly work, but have always come up empty-handed. The ads promise that you’ll learn how to put together adorable little craft projects and then sell them for a profit. The catch: There’s no market for your wares. Nobody wants to buy them. And no company will pay you for them either, no matter how much they promise to do so.”

Poor Reviews on other Business Sites

Are there poor reviews for the at-home business idea on other business sites? These sites are unbiased and allow real consumer testimonials, so you can get the low down on what’s legit. And when I looked at these opportunities, the reviews were overwhelmingly negative.

The Federal Trade Commission warns people to stay away from this scam saying:

“You see an ad that says you can make money assembling crafts or other products as an at-home business idea for a company that has promised to buy them. You may have to invest hundreds of dollars for equipment or supplies — like a sewing or sign-making machine from the company, or materials to make items like aprons, baby shoes, or plastic signs. Then you spend many hours making the “product.” But after you’ve bought your supplies and done the work, the company doesn’t pay you — supposedly because your work isn’t “up to standard.” Unfortunately, no work ever is, and you’re left with equipment and supplies, but no income.”

Have You Been Scammed

If you think you have provided your account details, passport, tax file number, license, Medicare, or other personal identification details to a scammer, contact your bank, financial institution, or other relevant agencies immediately.

We encourage you to report scams to the ACCC via the report a scam page. This helps us to warn people about current scams, monitor trends, and disrupt scams where possible. Please include details of the scam contact you received, for example, email or screenshot.

ACCC also provides guidance on protecting yourself from scams and where to get help.

Spread the word to your friends and family to protect them. Contact the relevant website to let them know the scammer’s profile name and any other details that may help them to stop others from being scammed. If you are interested in reading more information about working from home then here is another article that may help. Legitimate Work From Home

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